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Home  |  Technical Information  |  Conversion Process  |  Custom Machining  |  Custom Fabrication  |  EVents

Custom Machining for the Electric Golf Conversion


   There were a couple of parts I designed and machined for the conversion. All of these parts were designed using CAD with SolidWorks 2007. Some parts were then CAMed by hand and using my own web based CAM software, WebCAM. These parts were then CNC machined using a high precision micro machining center I use at my full time job with Schultz-Creehan (speaking of, check out the image on the S-C website of a 0.01" tall, or about 3 hair widths, logo in aluminum that I machined). Other conversion parts were machined by hand, and did not require CAM or CNC to make.


Tachometer Mounts
   I got a "KTA Tachometer Kit" in the conversion kit. The kit had a magnet and Hall Effect sensor made by the motor manufacturer and a tachometer gauge from Westach. The sensor and magnet required drilling and tapping into the shaft and housing in order to mount, which voids the warranty. My solution was to develop a mounting plate for the sensor and a shaft extension for the magnet. Both parts were epoxied using 3M DP-125 epoxy which would retain the warranty.

   I plan on selling these parts for a solution to everyone else that uses this motor and sensor. If you are interested in a part, please contact me at .

Assembled kit Sensor mount Magnet mount, nub fits into dimple at end of shaft and magnet mounts with a #10-32 screw into the tapped hole
Machined parts assembled Both mounts attached Kit and mounts fully assembled




Distribution Blocks
   To interconnect the 12V system, distribution blocks were created with copper square stock and plastic. These were mainly hand machined parts. I cut the copper with a reciprocating saw then faced the edges with an end mill in my drill press (admittedly very ghetto). I spotted the holes with my home made CNC machine then drilled with my drill press for both the copper and plastic.
Quadruple block Triple block Another triple block
Spotting holes on my homemade CNC router Drilling on the drill press Ghetto milling on the drill press
Completed parts Blocks installed and in use



Distribution Blocks Round 2
   After adding a 13th battery for the 12V system, I needed two more distribution blocks. This time I decided to machine them nicer with a better finish, engraved text, and Nickel plating for corrosion resistance. These were machined fully on the micro machining center at work except for drilling the holes on my drill press.
CAD rendering of the trunk area Facing off the ends View of the whole micro machining center
Engraving text Damn that looks good! Nickel plating a block
Nickel plated block next to pure copper block (with Nickel Acid solution still on it) Two nickel plated distribution blocks



Starter Cover
   The electric motor doesn't need a starter as the engined did. Removing the starter left a big hole in my transmission, so here's a cover for it.

Starter cover Machining on the high precision micro machining center And the finished part
The hole it will cover Cover installed



Power Steering Connector
   I had a hard time finding the right size connector for the power steering pump. It was probably some weird car thing, but I ended up finding something at Advance. This part had a bent tube on it instead of a barb, so I cut the tube off. I then got a threaded hose barb and machined the threaded section off on a lathe. My buddy/coworker/roommate Wayne then brazed the two fittings together. He got a pretty good joint and it certainly has been holding up to the pressure.



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